Old Yellers: Men’s Anger

Elaine Benes. Nineties feminist icon. Terrible dancer. Urban sombrero-wearer. Sponge-worthy decider and a no bullshit-giver-or-taker. In one Seinfeld episode, Elaine gets asked by her friends, Beth and Arnie, to be a character reference in their adoption case. She lets it slip with the agency officer that once when they were all at a movie, Arnie lost his temper with Elaine because she wouldn’t stop talking … Continue reading Old Yellers: Men’s Anger

Unlearn

Reporter Alex Bozarjian, a journalist with the NBC News affiliate out of Savannah, Georgia, was broadcasting live from an annual holiday charity race when a runner named Tommy Callaway slapped her on the behind as he jogged past. A quick poll of long-distance runners reveals that this is completely acceptable, totally normal behavior when you’re pushing your body to its limits, keeping your eyes peeled … Continue reading Unlearn

Cosmopolitan Articles, 1860

Whalebone? Cotton? Silk?: What Your Corset Says About You Vapors! When It’s Okay to Fake It! Tempt’n Temperance: The sexy social cause you need to get behind! How Pious Are You? Take the Cosmo Quiz! Va-Va-Venison! New Things in Stews! Is He Spending Too Much Time at the Ale House?: 7 warning signs you might need to produce a few more children to save your … Continue reading Cosmopolitan Articles, 1860

Meet The League of Extraordinarily Funny Women

Who didn’t want to be Mary Tyler Moore? Mary was a smart, successful, independent career woman out to conquer the world. That iconic beret toss at the end of the opening sequence also felt like a playful, network friendly way to flip the bird to the typical way women were portrayed on sitcoms—sad singles or else happily married baby making machines. Mary was great, groundbreaking … Continue reading Meet The League of Extraordinarily Funny Women

Women Do

At first it seems like the three women are just hanging out in the middle of the Commonwealth Ave. mall—a quiet, tree-lined promenade that runs like an artery through the heart of Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. Abigail Adams, Phillis Wheatley, and Lucy Stone appear as life-size bronze statues, posed around large granite blocks. Quotes from each woman are inscribed on the blocks, their words reaching … Continue reading Women Do